Review

Rameau’s Pygmalion
  • Camille Zamora brought a big, focused soprano to the Statue, and nicely captured the physical hesitations of her awakening.”
    – Wall Street Journal, Heidi Waleson
  • “The Statue was sung by the beautifully poised soprano Camille Zamora. There was a nice contrast between Ms. Savoy’s vibrant yet vulnerable delivery and the gleam of metal in Ms. Zamora’s focused voice.”
    – The New York Times, Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim
  • “A gorgeous female figure captivating her maker… Camille Zamora brought the Statue to life with consummate physical control and a richly attractive voice.”
    – Opera News, Judith Malafronte
  • “The stellar performance of the evening was Camille Zamora’s La Statue. To be clearly gifted as a singer is talent enough but to be a skilled mime as well is a rarity. Her gradual transformation from statue to human was riveting. As if she were singing a slow crescendo from pianissimo to fortissimo, her body broke out of her stone shell, not in a straight line but with a real sense of how it might be for a statue to become human, gaining two steps forward but losing one at the same time.”
    – Seen and Heard International, Stan Metzger
  • “Another statue, beautiful and glamorously gowned, is wheeled in and unloaded, this one being a real girl — superb soprano Camille Zamora, who was obliged to stand stock still for a very long time.”
    – Voce di Meche, Meche Kroop
  • “Lovely Camille Zamora was wheeled onstage as Pygmalion’s beloved Galatea, upstaging (the statue of) Kim Kardashian, who remained blessedly inanimate and silent… Zamora has a beautiful stage face, an elegant figure, and a warm soprano with a mezzo coloration.”
    – Gay City News, Eli Jacobson
  • “As La Statue and the newly prominent Céphise, sopranos Camille Zamora and Emalie Savoy respectively revealed opulent voices.”
    – Parterre, DeCaffarrelli

Check out production photos here.